Podcasts for Profit with Morgan Franklin

#006: How to Host Interviews People Actually Want to Listen To

April 08, 2024 Morgan Franklin Media Season 1 Episode 6
#006: How to Host Interviews People Actually Want to Listen To
Podcasts for Profit with Morgan Franklin
More Info
Podcasts for Profit with Morgan Franklin
#006: How to Host Interviews People Actually Want to Listen To
Apr 08, 2024 Season 1 Episode 6
Morgan Franklin Media

Do you want to host podcast interviews people ACTUALLY want to listen to?

This week I'll walk you through the 4 interview strategies every host should use to have listeners sneaking an AirPod in at work to listen to your podcast.

Whether you're thinking about starting a podcast, you have a solo show, interview-style show or you're not really sure what you're doing, this episode is for you.

Download your free pre-interview questionnaire here!

In this episode:
(1:30) What qualities actually make a guest worth hosting on your podcast.
(3:05) The biggest mistake most podcasters (including me) make when they first start having interviews on their show.
(5:45) How to get the best questions that your guest wants to answer and your audiences wants to hear!
(8:40) Set your guest up for success to have the best interview from both you and them.
(11:05) The unforgivable interview question that will ruin your episode before it even starts.
(14:00) How to properly promote interview episodes.

If you enjoy the show and you want to help more business owners and podcasters make money with their podcast will you give me a 5-star review? It helps the show rankings and gives more listeners an opportunity to find the show. Thank you!

Links mentioned in this episode:
Free Download: 10 Questions I Ask Every Guest in Their Pre-Interview
Follow Morgan on Instagram
Read the Show Notes

Show Notes Transcript

Do you want to host podcast interviews people ACTUALLY want to listen to?

This week I'll walk you through the 4 interview strategies every host should use to have listeners sneaking an AirPod in at work to listen to your podcast.

Whether you're thinking about starting a podcast, you have a solo show, interview-style show or you're not really sure what you're doing, this episode is for you.

Download your free pre-interview questionnaire here!

In this episode:
(1:30) What qualities actually make a guest worth hosting on your podcast.
(3:05) The biggest mistake most podcasters (including me) make when they first start having interviews on their show.
(5:45) How to get the best questions that your guest wants to answer and your audiences wants to hear!
(8:40) Set your guest up for success to have the best interview from both you and them.
(11:05) The unforgivable interview question that will ruin your episode before it even starts.
(14:00) How to properly promote interview episodes.

If you enjoy the show and you want to help more business owners and podcasters make money with their podcast will you give me a 5-star review? It helps the show rankings and gives more listeners an opportunity to find the show. Thank you!

Links mentioned in this episode:
Free Download: 10 Questions I Ask Every Guest in Their Pre-Interview
Follow Morgan on Instagram
Read the Show Notes

Morgan Franklin:

As a podcaster, there is nothing worse than publishing an interview that you really think is going to blow the lid off this thing and having the exact same download numbers that you're already having, or worse, less. In this episode, we're going to walk through the step by step technique I've used in hundreds of interviews to grow multiple top ranking shows, and teach you how to host interviews your audience will actually want to listen to. Hello, and welcome to podcast for profit. Hello, and welcome to podcast for profit. My name is Morgan Franklin. I'm a podcast producer, strategist, and educator. This podcast will help you create and grow a podcast that cuts through the noise of social media and speaks directly to your target audience. If you're ready to create a podcast that will align you with the experts in your industry, position yourself as a trusted leader and create another source of revenue for your business, you're in the right place. Having a great interview starts with finding great guests. I know this probably seems totally obvious to most of us. But while it might seem obvious, it's not always what we're doing. It's critical to find high quality guests that align with your podcast mission and will be of interest to your audience. Think about your audience. Think about what they want to hear from you. Think about why they follow who they follow and why they're following you. When you're looking for guests, you need to have some kind of rubric for what will make a great guest. If you don't, you're going to start letting any random person that sends you a DM or an email come on your show. Here's an example. Let's say I have a podcast about how to start a coffee shop. And my audience is people who might want to start a coffee shop or have just started a coffee shop in the past year, I'm going to have a simple criteria for my guests. They're in the coffee industry in some way, let's say a coffee shop owner, distributor, barista bean, roaster, etc. I don't really know that much about coffee. So just bear with me. They have a following of at least 1000 followers on one social media platform. And they have a unique perspective on the coffee industry in some way. That last one is pretty subjective, but the other two aren't. And it's important to have non negotiables for your guests. You've built this podcast with your blood, sweat and tears. And when some business guru sends you an email that they want to come on your podcast to talk about running a successful business, I want you to look over the guidelines you already established for your podcast and think about if that's actually applicable to what your listeners want to hear. And would this guest actually add anything to your show? Would your listeners care? or would this just be an episode they skip over because it has nothing to do with the industry and they don't want to waste their time. When you're researching guests for yourself, don't just go with the people that you already know because you know them. I know especially in the beginning, when you want to stay in your comfort zone and you still don't know if this podcast is gonna make it and you're nervous to reach out to people. It's easy to just ask the people that you already know that might not be a perfect fit, but you'll just make it work. Challenge yourself, send scary emails, get out of your comfort zone. But most importantly, do your research. You can literally find anything on the internet. So going back to my first example of a coffee shop podcast, instead of finding just a coffee shop owner to interview in your local area that you've met before and would probably say yes to you find a coffee shop owner that's been featured in Forbes magazine for their innovation and coffee bean roasting. I'm totally making this up. But you know what I mean? Finding high quality guests and having the confidence to ask them is 75% of the battle. I've had guests on my podcast that I had no business getting on my shows. That's because I was consistently doing the research. I was seeking out people and vetting them against the criteria I had created for that show. And I was looking at what they had done on other podcasts before. Finding people that are frequently on podcast can be kind of a double edged sword because on the one hand, they have practice they're familiar with being interviewed and being on camera, and they'll be inexperienced enough guests to give you a good response and have solid conversation. However, the downside to asking people that are on everybody else's podcast is that unless you're putting in the extra work to provide some kind of unique value to their listeners and yours, they probably won't care about the podcast that much. And if you're not doing the research that leads you to asking the same boring questions everybody else has asked their less likely to promote the episode, and people are less likely to listen overall. A few ways I find qualified guests are by googling related topics looking at big name journals like Forbes, Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, I'll get on LinkedIn and see us talking about the subject that I'm looking for. I'll go on social media. And also I cross check all of these references to make sure that someone is legit. I know from personal experience that getting published in a magazine isn't that difficult. So I want to make sure that this person is who they are claiming to be. Now that you've found an amazing guest, and you've taken the time to make sure that they'll actually be a value to your audience. You sent them a compelling invitation, and they agreed to come on your podcast, you have to prepare for the episode. This is so important, I'd say this is equally important to finding the right guest. And do not get lazy. Don't skip this part. This is going to be the difference between someone being proud of an episode with you and taking the time to share it with their audience and them not doing that. Sadly, so many guests don't share their episode. And most of the time, it's because we as podcasters aren't giving them something to share. You didn't know anything about them. You ask them the same questions they've already been asked in every interview, and you're just making content for the sake of making content and no one cares, including them. You can avoid all of this by just scheduling a pre interview or sending over a questionnaire to your guests and taking time to prepare your guest. In the podcast description, show notes, I will be including the 10 questions, I asked every podcast guest before writing their interview questions. And one of them is what is one of the biggest misconceptions about your business industry or whatever you do. I like that to lead into a question about what they wish they could share with every person that will listen to this show. I asked if there's something they've never shared on a podcast before that they'd like to share on my show. These are all questions you can research your way into asking. Try to make it a priority to get your guests on the phone for 10 to 15 minutes to ask them these pre interview questions. If someone is really busy, you can make these into a 10 question Google form and send them over. But in my experience, most people if they're too busy to get on a 10 minute phone call, they're going to be too busy to fill out a questionnaire and you'll end up getting behind on writing your episode and waiting for their response. So choose how you want to approach this and explain why it's important. If someone is taking the time to be on your podcast, chances are that they want to make the most out of it, and they'd be happy to help you. But you have to explain to them why you're doing it and how it will make their episode better. Typically, I write no more than six to 10 questions depending on the length of the podcast the experience of the host, and how much the guests talked in the pre interview. Pay attention to this when you get them on the phone. See how talky they are? Because if they're taking 30 minutes to answer one question that you have for them, you only need to write them a few questions unless you want this to be a Joe Rogan length podcast. Okay, so pay attention when you're doing the pre interview. And make sure you have the list of questions over to the guests, I'd say within three business days of your recording to give them some time to look them over and make any notes or comments to you if they have them. In the email where you send over the questions just make sure that you're setting up your guests for success. Tell them where the recording will be. If it's virtual, send them the link. If it's in person, give them clear directions to where they're going to be recording. If it's virtual, encourage them to wear headphones to avoid feedback and improve the sound quality of their recording. If they have a microphone or any other recording equipment, encourage them to use it by all means they should be using this equipment, make sure that you give them an opportunity to provide feedback on the questions or the episode overall. I always like to remind my guests that we're doing this for them, we really just want them to come out of this looking as good as possible. That's the whole reason we do these episodes is to share what they know and to share what we know. So it can grow both of our brands. So I think these are all things that are totally obvious to us, but are worth reminding your guests is like hey, thank you. And also I just want you to do the best that you can do. Make sure that you're reminding them of the time and date and if you're sending this more than a week ahead of the recording, I go ahead and just schedule an email to send out the day before reminding them that the podcast will be the next day. Do not book a guest and let them wonder what's going on. They are doing you a favor by coming on your show. So the first priority to them needs to be that you are are a good host. On the day of the recording, if you're virtual, make sure that you're coming on 10 to 15 minutes early, and that all of your equipment is set up, and you're on standby if your guest needs anything, especially if they are not familiar with recording podcasts, if you're in person, give him a few minutes to chat and put on your headphones and explain to them how this recording is going to work. Most people have never done a podcast recording in person. So if you're in person, make sure that you give them just a little bit of time to get used to that most people aren't doing the late night circuit, okay, so they need a minute to get used to this. And this is where the connection between you and the guest is going to be formed. These are the connections that as a business owner and a podcaster are going to grow your network and bring you more opportunities and success than advertisers ever could. The amount of connections that I have made, even as a producer through podcasting is insane. So make sure that you're giving a few minutes for these connections to happen and to have a genuine conversation off of the air. It hurts me that I have to say this, because we have already talked about the importance of writing questions that are centered around your guests experience and your audience. But do not, under any circumstances, start this interview with. So tell me a little about yourself. You might as well stop recording, and rip that cord out of the microphone. Because this interview is done. You've lost me, you've lost your audience. And you've lost all credibility as a podcast host. Do not ever start with some bland line making the guests introduce themselves. This is not their job. It's your job. It's your job to introduce your guest and just start a captivating conversation that your audience actually wants to listen to. If you're starting your podcast episode with something like tell us about you. You're saying to your guest, I didn't put in the effort to learn about you to introduce you or I didn't take the time to write something about you. Or worst of all, I'm just too lazy and I don't care. So I'm going to make you do the work. Plus, can I tell you a secret? Your audience doesn't want to hear about the background of your guest. They want to hear about why you ask them to come on the podcast. Please think about that. They want to hear about the special thing that you thought would bring value to them. No one cares about Laura's background working as the CFO for Starbucks from 1998 to 2003. I got bored just saying that. They want to hear about how she was responsible for opening 10,000 stores in California, and how you grow a coffee shop from three locations to 10,000. Should you give your guests their flowers and credibility. Absolutely. But never expect a guest to introduce themselves or to make your audience wonder why you've brought a guest on the show. Throughout your podcast recording, you want to be engaged, interested and personable. Talk about the guest with your guest focus on them and not you. This is not an opportunity for you to tell all the cool stories you can think of that are tangentially related to this topic. This is the time for you to be locked into that guest asking them questions and follow up questions where necessary and providing rich commentary for the listener. After the interview, take a moment to thank your guests genuinely, and ask them if there's anything that you can help them with. This is going to take you so far, and it's going to make it even more likely that they'll actually share your episode. Most of the people will never call you on it. But it's nice to know as a guest that when you take the time to be on someone's podcast that the host wasn't just doing this to piggyback off of your audience but they genuinely are interested in you as a person. And make sure that you're taking a moment to follow up with a thank you email or write a handwritten card. I prefer card because I'm extra and I'm from the south but I think that an email or DM or however you are communicating before will be just fine. The last thing is promote this podcast in a way that will bring in the audience you made it for when I'm saying this I'm meaning you're making graphics or content for this episode, letting your listener know what questions they're going to have answered from this episode. What are you covering? What is the guests sharing they've never shared before. For your audience who has never heard of this person before. This is the time for you to share the background and credibility. podcasting and podcast promotion is a layered event. Just like selling in a business. You're usually going to go through several touch points with the listener before they actually listen. So in the show notes in the promotional material and anywhere where you're talking about the episode, I need you to be crystal clear with the listener on what they are going to gain and why they cannot miss this episode. Make sure that you're taking the time to properly cross promote this episode and that you're repurposing your episode across your digital marketing. This includes your email list blog, traditional social media, Facebook, Instagram, LinkedIn, Tik Tok, and forums like Reddit, if that makes sense for your podcast. If you're making any promotional graphics for yourself, which I hope that you are, send these to your guests and make sure that you take the time to tag them when you're posting them, find out where they are on social media. Most people are really only active on one or two social medias. So make sure that you're putting in the effort and you're seeing where they are most active, because it is so much easier for someone to share your post than them to create a whole one even if you're sending them the graphics. Plus, when someone shares the content that you have created, you have the power to make sure that everything is tagged properly, that your website is on there that you are getting all of the credit that you deserve as well. There are no shortcuts to making quality content. My best advice if you aren't willing to put in the work to produce this level of an interview, is you stick to sole episodes to grow your own personal brand. Scheduling, recording and producing interviews are very time consuming. And if you can't take the time to do it correctly, that's okay. But know what the objectives of your podcast are and try to create content that will serve those outcomes. Don't forget that there's a free download with 10 questions I asked every guest in the show notes. And I promise if you take the time to ask those questions, you are going to see a huge improvement in both the quality of your interviews and the amount of listeners engaged in your episodes. Thank you so much for joining me on this episode. If you enjoyed the podcast and you'd like to hear more episodes like this one, go ahead and subscribe to the show new episodes air every Monday morning and if you found this episode valuable and you want to help other business owners and podcasters will leave me a five star review? It helps the show rank higher in the charts and brings more entrepreneurs the information they need to start making money on their podcast.

Podcasts we love